Canada Scores Poorly With Regard to Built Heritage Protection

Of the seven legislative tools available for protecting built heritage, our federal and provincial governments together have implemented only four.

Canada has so far only utilized these tools:- a national trust; a heritage register (which is only partially completed) and conservation standard; legislation to protect historic places (only at the provincial level); and legislation on archaeological resources (only at the provincial level).

The following tools, which are recognized as international best practices, are not used by the federal government:- tax incentives for historic places; legislation to protect world heritage sites; and legislation to protect heritage buildings belonging to the government.

Britain, Australia, the USA and France have implemented all seven*. Its lack of legislative conservation tools prevents our federal government from meeting international standards for heritage conservation.

 * The report of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainability Development Report on Canada’s Heritage is now viewable. Recommendations are from page 16 onward. See page iii to see if your MP was involved – write them with your support or to encourage them to pay attention. Pages 18-19 for how Canada fares against other key developed nations.

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Filed under archeology, architecture, cultural policies, heritage law, heritage planning, heritage politics

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